Lady Violet

My friend and neighbor, Karen Farmer stopped by to get some eggs and brought me a miniature bouquet of fresh-picked violets. What a gift! She said that her place has violets running wild in the grass-I had always thought of them as a forest dweller, preferring shady, rich soils. These purple beauties are potent! The whole room is infused with the sweet scent of violets. Violets always remind me of my Grandmother-the scent she chose to wear, her favorite color, and her dainty hand-painted tea cups with violet flowers on them. They are strong and sweet at the same time. I adore their little faces and their heart-shaped leaves.

In the 1930s, sweet violet was widely used to treat breast and lung cancer and still figures in alternative cancer therapies, especially after surgery, to prevent the development of secondary tumors. A good friend of mine just had surgery to remove a cancerous tumor in her breast (today! and is recovering) and I cannot help but think that lady violet is sending me a message. I plan to find some violet leaf and flower and make her an infusion this week.

I love the taste of violet flowers. They taste as intense as they smell. I have tasted white ones, purple ones, and the tri-colored beauties. I love them one at a time, or in a salad, or on brown rice. I have made violet flower cough syrup, violet vinegar, violet oil, violet flower essence, violet root tincture, but eating them is really the best. I made my husband a chocolate birthday cake covered in violets and was a tiny bit jealous that this November girl doesn't have violets blooming on her birthday. Eating violets excites me-they take me places-like a comet-way up above the clouds to the violet moonlight filled sky.